Bertrand Cavalier: Concrete Doesn’t Burn (Fw:Books, 2020)

Bertrand Cavalier investigates how political upheaval becomes visible in the urban landscape and how this affects the lives of the people who live in it. He photographs places that have been marked by armed conflicts in the past.

Read More

Antone Dolezal & Lara Shipley: Devil’s Promenade (Overlapse, 2021)

Dolezal and Shipley return to their home region of the Ozarks in the American Midwest, where locals persist in their search for a legendary floating orb of light that can only be seen from the Devil’s Promenade.

Read More

Mårten Lange: Ghost Witness (Loose Joints, 2020)

Mårten Lange (born 1984, Gothenburg, Sweden) is an artist working on a wide range of topics including nature, technology and the urban environment. He has published several books, including Citizen (Études Books, 2015), Another Language (MACK, 2012), The Mechanism (MACK 2017) and Chicxulub (self-published, 2016).

Read More

Ariko Inaoka: Eagle and Raven (Akaaka, 2020)

Eagle and Raven is a book of seven summers that Ariko Inaoka spent in Iceland, photographing the twin sisters Erna (Eagle) and Hrefna (Raven). The sisters grew from 9 to 16 years of age during the series.

Read More

Short Cuts 17

Short Cuts 17 presents 4 new photobooks: (1) Julião Sarmento: Café Bissau (Pierre von Kleist, 2020) (2) Stephen Berkman (Ed.): Predicting the Past—Zohar Studios: The Lost Years (Hat & Beard, 2020) (3) plant petter (Self-published, 2020) (4) Gerry Johansson: Ehime (T&M Projects, 2020).

Read More

Andy Sewell: Known and Strange Things Pass (Skinnerboox, 2020)

Andy Sewell’s first book The Heath was a winner of the International Photobook Award 2012 and is included in Martin Parr’s The Photobook: A History Vol. III. The photographs in this book are taken on either side of the Atlantic in places where the Internet is concentrated.

Read More

Martin and Inge Riebeek: The Essential (The Eriskay Connection, 2020)

Since 2010 artists Martin and Inge Riebeek (NL) have been collecting stories from people around the world for their video art project
The Essential. This book offers a selection of 225 video portraits with transcipts of the touching monologues and additional photos.

Read More

Ronghui Chen: Freezing Land (Jiazazhi Press, 2020)

Ronghui Chen is a Chinese photographer and storyteller based in Shanghai/ New Haven, whose work focuses on China’s urbanization. Known for his interest in the issues arising from the position of the individual within the urbanization and industrialization of China, Chen published his first collection of photographs named Chen Ronghui, now part of China’s Contemporary Photography Catalog.

Read More

Carolyn-Drake: Knit-Club (TBW Books, 2020)

Carolyn Drake works on long term photo-based projects seeking to interrogate dominant historical narratives and imagine alternatives to them. Her work explores community and the interactions within it, as well as the barriers and connections between people, between places and between ways of perceiving.

Read More

Bérangère Fromont: I don’t want to disappear completely (September Books, 2018)

French photographer Bérangère Fromont (1975) first studied film and literature at the Sorbonne before deepening her photographic practice with photographers such as Claudine Doury and Antoine d’Agata. Her work has been exhibited worldwide and has been featured in various web and paper publications.

Read More

Chris Suspect: Old Customs (Self-Published, 2020)

Chris Suspect is a street and documentary photographer hailing from the Washington, DC area. His street work specializes in capturing absurd and profound moments in the quotidian and his documentary work is the result of deep dives for years at a time into various subcultures.

Read More

Caroline and Cyril Desroche: Los Angeles Standards (Poursuite Editions, 2020)

Los Angeles Standards is a photographic portrait of Los Angeles which offers a way to view the city through 15 typologies which identify this unique city environment. The 1300 photographs were taken between 2008 and 2012 by French architects Caroline and Cyril Desroche during the years they live in Los Angeles. They are organized in order to compare and contrast the design archetypes that they have identified.

Read More