John Szarkowski: The Photographer's Eye: A Way of Seeing (Museum of Modern Art, 2007)

John Szarkowski’s The Photographer’s Eye, based on a landmark exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art in 1964 and first published in 1966, is an excellent introduction to the art of photography. It brings together pictures by both recognized masters and unknown photographers that offer an outline of photography’s creative visual language.

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Giles Price: Restricted Residence (Loose Joints, 2020)

London-based photographer Giles Price’s work explores the social impact of cultural, environmental and political phenomena. Restricted Residence examines the relocation of Japanese citizens to Namie and Iitate, two towns exposed to extreme radioactivity following the catastrophic leak at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant after the 2011 earthquake and tsunami.

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Frido Troost: An Educational Archive of 3000 Slides (Art Paper Editions, 2020)

Frido Troost (November 14, 1960 – April 22, 2013) was a Dutch photography historian, teacher at the Rietveld Academy and co-owner of the photo antiquarian bookshop ICM (Institute for Concrete Matter), which was established in 2000 in a former forge in Haarlem.

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Christer Strömholm: Till minnet av mig själv (Nordisk Rotogravyr, 1965)

Christer Strömholm (1918–2002) was one of the most influential Scandinavian photographers and the recipient of the 1997 Hasselblad Award.

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Seung-Woo Yang: The Best Days (New Edition) (Zen Foto Gallery, 2019)

Born in Korea, Seung-Woo Yang first came to Japan in 1996. In 2016, his publication “Shinjuku Lost Child” with Zen Foto Gallery, a monochrome street photography series which focused on the people at Kabukicho, Shinjuku received the 36th Domon Ken Award.

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Edward Burtynsky; Jennifer Baichwal; Nick de Pencier: Anthropocene (Steidl, 2019)

Anthropocene is a multidisciplinary body of work by Edward Burtynsky, Jennifer Baichwal and Nicholas de Pencier, which includes a photobook, a major travelling museum exhibition, a feature-length documentary film, and an interactive educational website.

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Ralph Eugene Meatyard: Stages for Being (University of Kentucky Art Museum, 2019)

Ralph Eugene Meatyard (1925 – 1972) made his living as an optician in Lexington while creating enigmatic photographs featuring friends and family members posed in abandoned places, often wearing masks or enacting symbolic gestures.

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Short Cuts 10

Short Cuts 10 presents another four titles of an excellent photobook year 2019. It starts in the peripheral areas of Berlin and ends in the northernmost city of the United States, Utqiagvik, Alaska.

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Max de Esteban: Heads Will Roll (Hatje Cantz, 2014)

Max de Esteban (* 1959 in Barcelona) is an artist working mostly in photography and video whose work is best known for his examination of the human condition under a technological regime.

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Pino Musi: Border Soundscapes (Artphilein Editions, 2019)

Pino Musi is a photographer and teacher based in Paris. His work showed multiple fields of interest such as anthropology, architecture, archeology and industry.

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Lisa Barnard: The Canary and The Hammer (Mack Books, 2019)

Lisa Barnard’s photographic practice is placed in the genre of documentary. Her work discusses real events, embracing complex and innovative visual strategies that utilise both traditional documentary techniques with more contemporary and conceptually rigorous forms of representation.

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Tolnes Fjellestad; Greve: Starman: Sophus Tromholt Photographs 1882 – 1883 (Forlaget Press, 2019)

Sophus Tromholt (1851–1896) was a teacher and northern lights researcher, but today he is remembered first for a unique series of portraits of the Sámi people living in and around Kautokeino in Norway. Starman is the first book dedicated to Sophus Tromholt’s photographs.

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