Paddy Summerfield: Home Movie

Paddy Summerfield’s Home Movie tells the oldest story, the saddest story, a story that includes the story-teller. It is the Fall of Man, falling from innocence into exile, a dark world of claustrophobic interiors, of low life bars and stained streets, of casual fornication in shabby bed and breakfast rooms.

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Petra Barth: Anderswo / Elsewhere

Petra Barth has focused her art on memory, relating to human, social and environmental issues in rural communities worldwide which is influenced by her own upbringing.

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Hanayo: Keep an Eye Shut

Keep an Eye Shut summarizes thirty years of the activities of Japanese photographer, artist, musician, and model Hanayo Nakajima.

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Maura Sullivan: Things We Remember

Things We Remember, Maura Sullivan’s first monograph, invites viewers into the mysterious, elegant, and compelling world that the New York City-based photographer creates. By composing and integrating her subjects into atmospheric locations suffused with natural light, Sullivan’s analog black and white photographs seem to recall a lost time.

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Yurian Quintanas Nobel: Dream Moons (Void, 2020)

Dreams Moons is a story in the first person. It mixes photography and text to tell on a journey through a bizarre dream. It takes place within the corridors and rooms of the artist’s house.

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Will Harris: You Can Call Me Nana (Overlapse, 2021)

A personal yet universal family memoir where a photographer confronts his grandmother’s dementia and tries to make sense of their changing relationship.

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Ward Long: Summer Sublet (Deadbeat Club, 2020)

Ward Long is a photographer living in Oakland, California. Working in his home state and the American South, Ward blends a documentary style with personal storytelling.

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Marvin Böhm: You’re Not As___As You Think (Kettler, 2020)

In 2017, Marvin Böhm’s mother was diagnosed with cancer. From then on, he began to capture his private life with a camera–led by his intuition. He had little interest in chronicling her suffering and illness: Böhm’s main goal was to “carry on” and continue into the future. His incessant interaction with the resulting images soon turned into a sort of therapy.

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