Will Harris: You Can Call Me Nana (Overlapse, 2021)

A personal yet universal family memoir where a photographer confronts his grandmother’s dementia and tries to make sense of their changing relationship.

Read More

John Divola: Terminus – (Mack Books, 2021)

New work by renowned Californian artist John Divola, celebrated for his idiosyncratic combination of photography, installation, and visual arts. These photographs made in a disused air force base continue Divola’s alternative vision of California, as seen in Zuma (1977) and Vandalism (2018).

Read More

Masao Yamamoto: Small Things in Silence – Second edition (RM, 2020)

Born in 1957 in Gamagori, in the Japanese prefecture of Aichi, Masao Yamamoto is a photographer who began his art studies as an oil painter under the supervision of Goro Saito in his hometown. Small Things in Silence offers a perspective on twenty years in the career of one of Japan’s most important photographers.

Read More

Ângela Berlinde: Transa – baladas do último sol (Jhannia Castro, 2020)

TRANSA, baladas do último sol explores a broad experimental approach in a multidisciplinary body of work that refers to photography, literature, comic book, painting and cinema in order to create a story inspired by the myth of Iracema, the “virgin of honey lips” from José de Alencar’s novel.

Read More

Camillo Pasquarelli: Monsoons never cross the mountains (Witty Books, 2020)

In the last five years Camillo Pasquarelli (*1988, Italy) has been working extensively in the valley of Kashmir, India, at first documenting the political conflict between the population and the Indian administration, and later trying to explore a more personal and oneiric approach to the issue.

Read More

Ragnar Axelsson: Arctic Heroes (Kehrer, 2020)

In his recent book Hetjur norðurslóða (Arctic Heroes) Icelandic photographer Ragnar Axelsson takes a poignant look at the fate of the Greenland sled dog.

Read More

Volker Hinz: Hello. Again. (Hartmann Books, 2021)

This project, coinitiated by Hinz himself, offers a comprehensive overview of his work beyond his well-known pictures, series, and themes, thus proving what a precise judge of character and an astute observer he was.

Read More

John Cohen: Look up to the moon (Steidl, 2020)

In the summer of 1955 a relatively naive and uninformed John Cohen crossed the straits of Gibraltar. He arrived in Tangier with a handwritten note in cursive Arabic; the man who had composed it in New York had told him to “keep this paper far from your passport.”

Read More

Posts navigation